Lunacy

Field Notes Lunacy Edition

The full, non subscriber, Lunacy edition 

The full, non subscriber, Lunacy edition 

The latest Field Notes seasonal release is called the Lunacy edition. This is the first seasonal release from Field Notes that I have bought since Snowblind from Winter 2015. Each edition released since then just didn’t work for me and I was starting to feel like I had Field Notes overload. However when this edition launched I was immediately drawn to it. I pre-ordered from the wonderful Pocket Notebooks and received these late last week.

Initial thoughts

There is something about Field Notes black edition notebooks that work so well. Every time they release one of these notebooks they sell out quickly and prove to be very popular. This edition is no different. The black cover with the cut out moon in its different phases is something that hasn’t been attempted before. To be honest initially I was hesitant about this feature worried that it could result in the notebook ripping or tearing with use. However seeing this in hand the cover stock is really thick and sturdy so I am a little more confident that this won’t happen, but time will tell.

My least favourite of the three books is the first/last quarter moon (thank you Field Notes for the correct terminology). This moon cut out looks very rigid and structured. I know this is an actual moon phase but I just feel like on the notebook itself the half circle and straight edge is really harsh.

The cover stock in lovely and heavy in the hand I guess to help prevent any tearing. The Field Notes branding is embossed on the cover and seems to have a very dark grey hint to it. The embossed full moon on the reverse of the notebook is a really nice touch. There is a lot going on with the design for this edition. I always liked the information on the reverse of the County Fair edition Field Notes and this moon image reminds me of that.

Embossed full moon on the reverse of this edition

Embossed full moon on the reverse of this edition

Inside the front cover you have a sheet of paper which has a full view of the moon. The moon side page has some texture to it and is set against a space backdrop. On the reverse of this page the texture is much smoother and holds some facts about the moon, its distance from earth, phases etc.

The other side of this sheet at the rear of the notebook has a view of the Dark Side of the moon including some information about this and on the reverse of this page some fun moon speil. The werewolf information is the polar opposite of the facts on the front sheet and hints at Field Notes sense of humour.

Back page fun moon facts and pen test

Back page fun moon facts and pen test

The paper in this edition has a reticle grid, not a favourite of mine, on grey paper. The grey paper actually helps to hide the reticle grid which is a good thing. The grey paper is a really nice colour and obviously works perfectly for the moon theme. Personally I don’t remember using an edition from Field Notes with this colour paper, so it’s a first for me.

Grey reticle grid compared to other Field Notes editions

Grey reticle grid compared to other Field Notes editions

Also this paper is actually fountain pen friendly. I tried out a few fountain pens in this notebook and there was no feathering at all. I even tried a broad nib to really test this out but it held up well. To really top it off there was no bleed through on the reverse page. This isn't the nicest paper but the feel and thickness really works with fountain pens which is personally something I have wanted for a long time! It just adds to the appeal of this edition.

No bleed through, you wouldn't even know I'd used a fountain pen!

No bleed through, you wouldn't even know I'd used a fountain pen!

Overall looney thoughts

Other black editions: Ravens Wing, Lunacy and Night Sky

Other black editions: Ravens Wing, Lunacy and Night Sky

This is the first edition from Field Notes that I have felt compelled to buy. I have an extensive collection of Field Notes memo books and had started to feel guilty that I was buying more than I would ever use. When Sweet Tooth was released I decided not to buy as I could figure out how I would use this edition and since then I have had the same feeling for each release. I had also started to prefer a passport size notebook and swayed towards using Baron Fig notebooks. However the latest Field Notes release may have piqued my interest in the brand again. I still enjoy the different ways that Field Notes push the pocket notebook boundaries and find unique ways to produce small notebooks. They aren’t all for me, this fact has taken me some time to figure out, but I have definitely gone looney for this edition.